Aktuelle Infos von Indianern in Nordamerika in Englisch

Sie erhalten die Möglichkeit, sich über aktuelle Situationen bei den Indianern Nordamerikas in Englisch zu Informieren und an entsprechenden Hilfsaktionen teilzunehmen.

Evelin Cervenkova
Begründerin der Lakota Oyate Information

Current News by Native Americans in North America in English

You have the possibility to inform yourself about the current life of Native Americans and you can take part in helping actions.

Evelin Červenková
Founder of the Lakota Oyate Information in East-Germany


Von: Indian Country Today general@indiancountrytoday.com
Date: Do., 5. Sept.
Subject: Your E-Weekly Newsletter after Labor day
To: lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

September 2019 | Issue Number 64

The Indian Country Today E-weekly Newsletter is here!

View Online Here or Download Here

Now on the Indian Country Today site:

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: 'Electoral College is a scam...

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-New York, said the Electoral College is a "bogus, scam" and that Native American reservations should get a vote’....

Read more
newsmaven.io

Native boys dance, too

Jock Soto has a vivid memory from when he was five, of changing in the backseat of his father's car into a pair of lacy blue tights on his way to his first ballet audition in Phoenix, Arizona. Adam McKinney was 17 when he received a book...

Read more
newsmaven.io

Toxic Alaska mine could 'destroy sockeye salmon fishery

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy had nothing but encouragement for a potential investor in a controversial mine. "Alaska's open for business," Dunleavy told Wheaton Precious Metals, Ltd. of Canada, in a July 30, 2019 letter. He said, "A fair, efficient, ...

Read more
newsmaven.io

4,000+ beads, 100's of communities, one image

For the Missing and Murdered Indigenous women. An art installation by Native artist Cannupa Hanska Luger has been unveiled in Toronto's Gardiner Museum that honors missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and the LGBTQ2S communities affected

Read more
newsmaven.io

'The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance' An enchanting journey

It's been almost forty years since Jim Henson and Frank Oz's hit theaters in 1982. The magic, imagination and soul of the Gelfling and Skeksis live in an enchanting journey following seven clans of Gelfling & Indigenous themes. By Vincent Schilling

Read more
newsmaven.io

Want to contribute to Indian Country Today?

Indian Country Today is looking for experienced freelance contributors in Indian Country for stories. Send pitches and list of previous work / links to Associate Editor / Freelance Editor Vincent Schilling.

Email: vschilling@indiancountrytoday.com.
Twitter: @VinceSchilling / Instagram: @VinceSchilling

Check out the new Indian Country Today on your smartphone!

Click Here

Follow the Indian Country Today Team on Social Media

Editor
Mark Trahant
Twitter

Associate Editor
Vincent Schilling
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Instagram

Reporter / Producer
Jourdan Bennett-Begaye
Twitter

Press Pool
Twitter

News Releases
and Opinions
Lisa J. Ellwood
Twitter

Indian Country Today
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NEWS
OPINION
CLASSIFIED
PRESS POOL

Contact Us
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National Congress of American Indians | Embassy of Tribal Nations, 1516 P Street NW, Washington, DC 20005


Von: Indigenous Environmental Network jennifer@ienearth.org
Date: Fr., 30. Aug. 2019
Subject: ACTION ALERT: Dangerous LNG project in Puyallup territory nears final approval, public comments needed
To: Evelin Cervenkova lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

View as Web Page
The Indigenous Environmental Network

The last hurdle for the Tacoma Liquified Gas (LNG) project is a permit from the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA), a regional government agency charged with limiting pollution in King, Kitsap, Pierce and Snohomish Counties. The LNG project is designed to deliver fracked gas through Tacoma to an industrial facility situated between the Blair and Hylebos Waterways. There the gas will be super-cooled and pressurized into a liquid state, known as LNG which will be used as fuel.

The LNG facility is under construction on the ancestral homeland of the Puyallup Tribal Nation.

The Puyallup Tribal Nation was never consulted about the dangerous project that will no doubt have a devastating effect on their land, economy, and culture. As we have seen so many times with other projects, the governmental agencies in charge of the oversight of the Tacoma LNG left tribal communities out of the conversation and have ignored their concerns.

The Puyallup Tribe is one of 18 tribal nations in Washington opposing the project, these nations are joined by 18 human and civil rights groups, in addition to dozens of local and statewide environmental organizations.

An LNG facility in an urban area like Tacoma is an uncommon practice for the industry because it is known to be risky. Local advocates opposing the project have pointed out that the company hid safety studies from the public and regulators until key approval deadlines had passed.
In July, PSCAA released a preliminary determination to issue permits for Tacoma LNG. The determination was widely criticized by opponents for using outdated assumptions and flawed science. This final permit, known as the Notice of Construction Application, will be decided in early September.

Please submit a comment by September 9th demanding the PSCAA deny the final permits for the Tacoma LNG.

ONLINE:
news.puyalluptribe.com/lng
VIA EMAIL:
Ralph Munoz
PublicComment@pscleanair.org
VIA MAIL:
Ralph Munoz
1904 Third Avenue, Suite 105
Seattle, WA 98101

Comment suggestions:

Tell the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA) that the Tacoma Liquified Gas project permit should be denied:

<> The Puyallup Tribal Nation was never consulted about this project, which runs counter to federal Indian policy. There was no consideration about how this project will impact or affect the tribe’s health, sustainability, jurisdiction, treaty and hunting fishing rights.
<> This project violates the treaty rights of the Puyallup Tribal nation and other tribal nations.
<> There was no public health impact assessment conducted for this project. The risk for pollution and toxic contamination is far too great for local communities.
<> The Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (FSEIS) that was submitted for this project was flawed and used outdated science to evaluate greenhouse gas emissions.

###

Established in 1990, The Indigenous Environmental Network is an international environmental justice nonprofit that works with tribal grassroots organizations to build the capacity of Indigenous communities. IEN’s activities include empowering Indigenous communities and tribal governments to develop mechanisms to protect our sacred sites, land, water, air, natural resources, the health of both our people and all living things, and to build economically sustainable communities.

Learn more here: ienearth.org

To Make A Tax Deductible Donation:
Paypal.me/IENEarth

The Indigenous Environmental Network | PO Box 485 | Bemidji, MN 56619 | http://www.ienearth.org/


Von: Indian Country Today general@indiancountrytoday.com
Date: Fr., 2. Aug. 2019
Subject: Your E-Weekly Newsletter for August 2, 2019
To: lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

August 2, 2019 | Issue Number 62

The Indian Country Today ?E-weekly Newsletter is here!

View Online Here or Download Here

Now on the Indian Country Today site:

The 2020 Indigenous Hip Hop Awards - Submit now

Indigenous Hip Hop artists from the United States and Canada are getting their very own awards show in 2020. Hosted by Mike, Bone.

Read more
newsmaven.io

Native women in leadership share 'common struggles'

When women participate in their ceremonies, they are grounded with those values. They're balanced spiritually, in mind and body, because that is what carries them through.

Read more
newsmaven.io

Native American mascots are dehumanizing

As a Native American woman, I am regularly confronted with mascot images that dehumanize Native Americans as hostile and aggressive. These images are usually cartoonish depictions of our traditional dress and lifestyle from the 1800s.

Read more
newsmaven.io

No government shutdown after president signs budget

President Donald J. Trump signed a $2.7 trillion budget into law this afternoon in Washington. The White House said the deal "suspends the public debt limit" until after the election. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 ...

Read more
newsmaven.io

Reppin' Indian Country worldwide: Taboo, Black Eyed Peas

He's been all over the world singing and performing with the Black Eyed Peas. Taboo, as one of the multi-Grammy winning artists of the world-famous group, proudly wears his large beaded medallion on stage for all the world to see.

Read more
newsmaven.io

Want to contribute to Indian Country Today?
Indian Country Today is looking for experienced freelance contributors in Indian Country for stories. Send pitches and list of previous work / links to Associate Editor / Freelance Editor Vincent Schilling.

Email: vschilling@indiancountrytoday.com.
Twitter: @VinceSchilling / Instagram: @VinceSchilling

Check out the new Indian Country Today on your smartphone!

Click Here

Follow the Indian Country Today Team on Social Media

Editor
Mark Trahant
Twitter

Associate Editor
Vincent Schilling
Twitter
Instagram

Reporter / Producer
Jourdan Bennett-Begaye
Twitter

Press Pool
Twitter

News Releases and Opinions
Lisa J. Ellwood
Twitter

Indian Country Today
Twitter
Facebook Page

Visit Our Website
TOP STORIES
NEWS
OPINION
CLASSIFIED
PRESS POOL

Contact Us
Advertising
About Us

National Congress of American Indians | Embassy of Tribal Nations, 1516 P Street NW, Washington, DC 20005

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Von: Kevin Locke booking.kevinlocke@gmail.com
Date: Di., 30. Juli 2019
Subject: Master Flute Artist, Indigenous Cultural Ambassador Kevin Locke will be coming through your area
To: Kevin Locke lockekevin@aol.com
Cc: Evelin Cervenkova lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com, [...]

Greetings!

Kevin asked me to share with you his Indigenous Cultural Program descriptions and special group discounts below. Please feel free to share the brochures, fliers, promotionals and the attached Bio with possible venues, people and contacts you have that may like to book Kevin in Switzerland or the neighboring countries!!

National Heritage Fellow, Master Flute Artist, Indigenous Cultural Ambassador Kevin Locke will be coming through your area and thought you might want to take advantage of the his cultural/educational programs for the students you serve (see attached BIO and www.kevinlocke.com).

Description of Kevin Locke Indigenous Cultural Programs:
Hoop of Life Program (60 min) incorporates Indigenous Flute music samples from the prairies and beyond, Sign Language, Prayer songs in Lakota language, story telling and much more. The hoop dance is a choreographed prayer invoking the universal metaphor of the hoop - a symbol that for all peoples represents; peace, unity, beauty, balance, continuity and harmony. It is a prayer that we may all be restored to wholeness and wellbeing; physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually not just as individuals but collectively with all of humankind and creation. A message frankly humanity is in increasing need of hearing and reinforcing with the tragedies of societal backdrop!

Indigenous Flute Workshops (1.5-2 hr long) is where Kevin provides all materials, assembles the flute per person, teaches the flute songs and leaves the students at a level of competency that they can practice songs from an instructional song book he co-authored. In North American Indigenous Flute (First Flute) genre, Kevin is just one of a few individuals that actively perpetuates the traditional musical tradition specific to what makes the North American Indigenous flute unique. The design of the Indigenous Style North American Flute used in Kevin’s workshop is based on a flute in Kevin's own collection, grandfather Powasheik’s over 100 year old flute. The kit is comprised of assemble-ready flute including the pre-drilled flute body and components. It is Kevin's vision to honor the authentic history, tradition and teachings of the Indigenous North American Flute.Flute Workshop offerings were geared specifically towards delivering Indigenous flute curriculum to schools in Dakota territory, however due to overwhelming response, Kevin expanded it to meet the needs of the larger community. Kevin recently gotten a Cultural Capital Fellowship from First peoples Fund for his work towards revitalizing the First Flute (see link below).

https://www.firstpeoplesfund.org/news/2019/2/26/revitalizing-the-north-american-indigenous-flute?utm_source=Arts+South+Dakota+arts+events+emails+%26+advocacy+updates&utm_campaign=cf2c51d807-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_01_29_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2debda3a3b-cf2c51d807-91046171&mc_cid=cf2c51d807&mc_eid=0ed8aea7af

Revitalizing the North American Indigenous Flute
www.firstpeoplesfund.org
Kevin Locke is an internationally-recognized master traditional folk artist, visionary hoop dancer, indigenous Northern Plains flute player/recording artist, cultural ambassador, and an educator. A citizen of the Standing Roc

GROUP PRICING:

The most cost effective way to bring Kevin to school is partnering of 3 or more sister schools in the area for the most cost-saving pricing.

Hoop of Life Assembly programs (60 min each) run the following group discount:

$1000 for single school/program
$900 per school for 2 schools/programs
$800 per school for 3 schools/programs

Indigenous Flute Workshops (1.5-2 hr per workshop and 25-30 participants each for ideal learning environment) are geared towards beginner learners and uses the home-grown authentic flute of the North American Continent in its original tuning (The First Flute). Kevin has a special combo packet with Indigenous Flute workshops and a Hoop of Life general Assembly showcasing the flute learners together (3 hr program) and this combo packet runs the following group discount:

$1200 for single school/workshop
$1100 per school for 2 schools/workshops
$1000 per school for 3 schools/workshops

Below you will find some fliers to pass around your administrators/sister schools in the area.

Please let us know if there is an opportunity to enrich your community with any of these cultural educational programs.

Thank you!
Pilamayaye!

Ceylan Isgor (Artist Assistant to Kevin Locke)

Lakota Performing Arts
www.kevinlocke.com
booking.kevinlocke@gmail.com

(561) 270-7185 (tel)

Educating children and youth who will define the character of the future society we like to build!

On Mon, Jul 29, 2019 at 5:09 AM Kevin Locke lockekevin@aol.com wrote:

Dear friends,
I have a late February booking in and around the Zurich area and would love to extend my itinerary to the surrounding region and countries.
We can send you more information and look forward to following up on any potential interest.
Until soon,
Kevin
Standing Rock Rez


Gesendet: Donnerstag, 29. März 2018
Von: "One Spirit" jbaker@nativeprogress.org
An: lakotaoyateinfo@gmx.de
Betreff: Allen Youth Center Invites Interested Pine Ridge Citizens (ages 10 & up) to Art Camp

ONE Spirit will provide food and transportation to Reservation residents (ages 10 & up) who wish to attend art camp at the Allen Youth Center.

Artist in Schools and Communities Residency Grant Approved by South Dakota Arts Council

We are excited to announce that the our request for an Artist in Residency grant has been approved by the South Dakota Arts Council! This means that now we will only have to pay half of the artist's fee and the rest will be paid by the Art's Council.

The Allen Youth Center will host 4 weeks of Art Camp with renown Lakota artist, Randy Blaze of Cuny Table.

We invite participants, ages 10 to adult and all skill levels, from beginner to expert from across the Reservation who would like to be part of the fun. There is room for the first 100 applicants to attend.

ONE Spirit will provide the food and transportation for Lakota individuals who wish to participate in the camps.

The Art Camps will be held the last two weeks of June, 2018 and the first two weeks of July for a total of four weeks. The same person can attend all four weeks.

People attending the Camps will with work with multiple media such as drawing, painting, sculpture and pottery! ONE Spirit is purchasing a kiln to be housed at the Youth Center and used by the center and the Art Camps.

Interested in Attending?

There is room for the first 100 applicants to attend. If you would like to attend Art Camp, please email Lisa Knouff, lknouff@nativeprogress.org or text 614-940-5046

Meet Lakota Artist, Randy Blaze

Randall Blaze, of Oglala Lakota descent, grew up and graduated from high school in Montana. Then, he enlisted in the US Navy.

Blaze went on to earn a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with honors from the University of Montana in 1977. He has received more than 80 national awards over three decades for his artwork. Blaze has participated in international exhibitions, and his work is represented in numerous public and private collections.

Today, the artist resides in South Dakota on the land of his ancestors. He finds it a peaceful place ... a land of beautiful sunrises and beautiful sunsets.

He has opened a gallery and art center fully equipped with studios for ceramics, metal smithing, painting and two-dimensional design. Oglala Art Center provides intercurriculum workshops for students K-12 and is available for continuing adult education. He also works with children through the artist-in-schools program for the South Dakota Arts Council.

"I travel to schools all over the state, although I am partial to working on the rez, as it allows me to come full circle with my life and heritage. I was taught the concepts and techniques of art by a generation before me, and I will pass that knowledge on to a generation after me.”

“I am creatively aware of the secret workings of nature and natural materials. Every medium manipulated by an artist has its own distinct and special nature. Creatively exploring variations in nature has been my motivation as an artist until 9-11.”

His post 9-11 pieces often portray the human spirit among chaos and destruction.

“Competition is a stimulating and positive aspect of my life. It is a way for me to endeavor to the best I am capable of being as an artist. It makes me think of the pride my Oglala ancestors would feel counting coup. It makes me feel like a modern day road warrior.” (http://aktalakota.stjo.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=8693)

Help with Funding

Even with the Grant we were awarded there will be expenses:

Will you help make this happen?

Donate Now

Copyright © 2018 One Spirit, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
ONE Spirit
PO Box 3209
Rapid City, SD 57709

Visit our website at: http://nativeprogress.org/en


From: Tribal College Journal publisher@tribalcollegejournal.org
Date: 2018-03-28
Subject: Solar energy careers | Job creation | Inclusion is better than exclusion
To: lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

Subscribe | Job Board | Donate

An Array of Opportunities: Building a Sustainable Future at Leech Lake Tribal College

Solar energy is being harnessed to heat homes through Minnesota's long winter and LLTC is leveraging the new infrastructure to connect students with solar energy training and careers.

Read more

Web Exclusive

Gerald "Carty" Monette on Job Creation

The former leader of Turtle Mountain Community College discusses the important role TCUs can play in job creation.

Read more

TCJ Student

Inclusion > Exclusion

Inclusion supports learners as individuals and brings about a functional community process of understanding.

Read more

From the Archives

Entrepreneurs Stimulate Tribal Economies

From 1987 to 1992, Native-owned businesses grew five-fold -- and tribal colleges played an important role.

Read more

Tribal College News

AIHEC Student Conference a Success

Leech Lake Tribal College Receives Grant from Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community

http://tribalcollegejournal.org/leech-lake-tribal-college-receives-grant-from-shakopee-mdewakanton-sioux-community/

Leech Lake Tribal College Receives Grant from Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community
March 21, 2018

The Leech Lake Tribal College (LLTC) is pleased to announce that a $42,000 grant was recently received from the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC). The grant will be used to purchase a transportation vehicle that will allow the college to deliver more off campus educational and support services to students.

“The Leech Lake Tribal College is extremely grateful to the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community for their generous donation to assist us as we continue to grow programs and deliver high quality educational and support services to our students. This grant assistance comes to us at a time of great need and it is with our deepest appreciation that we accept this gift and put it to great use as we will be able to further engage our students in educational, cultural, and sporting events,” states President Pat Broker.

SMSC is a federally recognized, sovereign Indian tribe located southwest of Minneapolis/St. Paul. With a focus on being a good neighbor, good steward of the earth, and good employer, the SMSC is committed to charitable donations, community partnerships, a healthy environment, and a strong economy. The SMSC and the SMSC Gaming Enterprise (Mystic Lake Casino Hotel and Little Six Casino) are the largest employers in Scott County. Out of a Dakota tradition to help others, the SMSC has donated nearly $300 million to organizations and causes since opening the Gaming Enterprise in the 1990s, and has contributed millions more to regional governments and infrastructure such as roads, water and sewer systems, and emergency services.

American Indian College Fund Names Cynthia Lindquist Honoree of the Year and Announces Students of the Year

http://tribalcollegejournal.org/american-indian-college-fund-names-cynthia-lindquist-honoree-of-the-year-and-announces-students-of-the-year/

American Indian College Fund Names Cynthia Lindquist Honoree of the Year and Announces Students of the Year

Dina Horwedel March 14, 2018

The American Indian College Fund honored Dr. Cynthia Lindquist, president of Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC) in Ft. Totten, North Dakota, for her outstanding contributions to American Indian higher education as its Tribal College and University Honoree of the Year. Dr. Lindquist, along with 34 American Indian scholarship recipients named as students of the year, were lauded at a reception hosted by the College Fund in Bismarck, North Dakota. The program, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Foundation, awarded Dr. Lindquist a $1,000 honorarium and each student of the year a $1,200 scholarship.

Lindquist says she never set out to be a college president. “College was a dream for me as a high school kid. I was the oldest of 13 kids, and there was no money for college,” she says. But thanks to her parents and both sets of grandparents raising her with a strong work ethic, college is exactly where she landed.

After graduating from high school Lindquist went to work for Sioux Manufacturing Corporation in Fort Totten as a secretary clerk. When the company was established, it was managed by white men from the Brunswick Corporation. But her tribe, the Spirit Lake Dakota, set the goal to train tribal members to become leaders in the company. She saw an opportunity for a higher education. “I left being a secretary clerk to get an undergraduate degree at the University of North Dakota, and lo and behold, who was there but Karen Gayton Swisher and David Gipp (who later became fellow tribal college presidents)! I was in college with other Indians!”

Lindquist says at the time there were not many other American Indian college students. But she persisted with her coursework from the 1970s to early 1980s, and returned to the Sioux Manufacturing Corporation in 1981 with a bachelor’s degree. She became a manager. “After five to six months, our chairman at the time, Elmer White, asked me to work for the tribe as the health director planner. And that is how it all began. I was in that role for seven years. I got to know all about Indian health and health systems,” she

Lindquist went on to earn her master’s degree in public administration with an emphasis on Indian health systems from the University of South Dakota. For two-and-a-half years she studied while working and driving every two months to Rapid City, South Dakota—a 9 to 12-hour commute, depending on the weather. “It was really intense. We got stuck in blizzards, you name it.” But she found that the opportunity for interacting with other Natives in the program were better this time: 15 of the 30 people in the program were Native, including Lynn Davis, the wife of Carty Monette, the founding president of Turtle Mountain Community College.

Like many of the people in her cohort, Lindquist says, “We never aspired to our roles. We were in the right place at the right time. Opportunity opened up. The self-determination movement was beginning around the late seventies and early eighties, and Indian Health Service (IHS) was working hard to establish Indian health programs.” Lindquist’s health career path eventually led to the national level where she worked on a traditional medicine initiative for the IHS. She was also the first political appointee for IHS, working as a chief of staff for the director for the Clinton administration before returning to North Dakota, where she was appointed by Governor Ed Schafer as the director of the North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission.

Eventually, Lindquist was recruited by two tribal elders to apply for the position of president at Cankdeska Cikana Community College. The transition was a logical one. In addition to hard work being a family value, education is too. Lindquist’s mother was on the CCCC board of regents and was also a CCCC graduate “way before I became president.” Lindquist also had experience there, having taught classes when she was the tribe’s health director/planner. She jumped at the chance. “I have been there ever since. I love being back home, with my family, and with my Mom, who just turned 88,” she says.

Things happen for a reason. Lindquist says her healthcare background equipped her perfectly for her role as a leader in a Native-serving higher education institution. “If people don’t have some concept of health and well-being, they cannot be a college student. You have to be physically, mentally, and spiritually healthy and ask, ‘Am I a good role model?’”

Lindquist went on to earn a Ph.D. in educational leadership from the University of North Dakota in 2006. She used her educational path and healthcare grant-making experience to grow her campus. “I put in for every grant from multiple funding sources. I quadrupled the size of my campus in 15 years,” she says.

When she started at the college, it was housed “in a typical leftover federal building. The white walls were dirty and the building contained asbestos.” She wondered who would want to go to school there. After learning that abandoning the building was not an option due to financial investments the federal government and American Indian College Fund had made in it, she set to work cleaning it up. “We made the renovations look seamless and tied the old in with the new,” she says. The campus buildings are now all connected, a necessity in the cold North Dakota winters.

As a leader Lindquist says she is most proud of her college’s good data and transparency. “The community college belongs to the people. We want integrity there. We want to practice what we preach and give back to the community.” Her employees share her commitment. Lindquist says they are devoted, resourceful, and efficient. “Ideally we should have one-third more employees, like a grant writer, a data specialist, and a transfer specialist. But we have good, qualified people. Our teachers drive 40-50 miles one way from small farming communities around the reservation. And when we have 40 graduates every May, we are as proud as could be. Many would not be college students without Cankdeska Cikana Community College.”

Lindquist goes on to note, “There is a lot of historical trauma in our community. The suspicion of education in our communities still lingers. Slowly we are breaking it.” She credits integrating prayer, culture, and language for that.

The role of a tribal college president isn’t just a job, it is a way of life for Lindquist. In addition to focusing her work on the Dakota way of life, her personal life reflects that, with a focus on prayer and family. She enjoys spending time in ceremonies and with her extended family of three children, eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. She also enjoys gathering with other tribal college presidents, “Talking to each other, energizing each other, and helping keep things in perspective,” she says.

Lindquist’s Dakota name, Hoton Ho Waste Winyan, means Good Voice or Good Talk Woman, and was bestowed upon her in honor of her great grandmother. “To carry a Dakota name implies you speak the truth and from your heart,” she says. And she carries it well. “It’s good work. I am humbled and I am glad I am home and I am glad I got the experiences to be able to do what I do. It’s a privilege to do this work and know I have a team supporting me, all with the goal of student success.”

The 34 students named as students of the year are a testament to the hard work of tribal college presidents like Dr. Lindquist, as well as their individual commitments to education. The scholars honored by the American Indian College Fund include:

Aaniiih Nakoda College - Shauntae St. Clair
Bay Mills Community College - Alea Ward
Blackfeet Community College - Lana Wagner
Cankdeska Cikana Community College - Nicole Brown
Chief Dull Knife College - Rebecca Cook
College of Menominee Nation - Adam Schulz
College of the Muscogee Nation - Dakota Kahbeah
Diné College - Jordan Mescal
Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College - Jeroam DeFoe
Fort Peck Community College - Justin Gray Hawk Sr.
Haskell Indian Nations University - Cody Lanyate
Illisagvik College - Amber Downey
Institute of American Indian Arts - Charlie Cuny
Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College - Joshua Robinson
Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Com. College - Melissa Knop
Leech Lake Tribal College - Alicia Bowstring
Little Big Horn College - Yolanda Turnsplenty
Little Priest Tribal College - Kellen Kelsey
Navajo Technical University - Ashley Joe
Nebraska Indian Community College - Cornelia Farley-Widow
Northwest Indian College - Frank Lawrence
Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College - Caley Fox
Oglala Lakota College - Jamie White Face
Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College - Patrick Nahgahgwon
Salish Kootenai College - JoDawna Tso
Sinte Gleska University - Pauline Jackson
Sisseton Wahpeton College - Deborah Anderson
Sitting Bull College - Kaylie Trottier
Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute - Martinez Wagner
Stone Child College - McKenzie Gopher
Tohono O’odham Community College - Diana Antone
Turtle Mountain Community College - Samantha Bercier
United Tribes Technical College - Austin Cree
White Earth Tribal and Community College - Corey Weaver

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Gesendet: Sonntag, 25. März 2018
Von: "Tony Castanha" castanha@hawaii.edu
An: papbullslist-l@lists.hawaii.edu
Betreff: Fwd: UPDATE ? REVERENCE FOR ALL CREATION: A Three-Day Event & Fundraiser ?

*fyi

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers info@grandmotherscouncil.org
Date: Sat, Mar 24, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Subject: UPDATE ? REVERENCE FOR ALL CREATION: A Three-Day Event & Fundraiser ?

REGISTER HERE

Dear Friends and Supporters of the Grandmothers Council,

Join the Grandmothers Council on their first LIVE online event!

Now more than ever the call of Grandmother Earth is being heard by millions of people around the world. We are called to rise, to learn from the wisdom of our elders, and to stand unified as one, leading a new way for the next generations.

REVERENCE FOR ALL CREATION: A Three-Day Online Event & Fundraiser
APRIL 20-22, 2018

Reverence For All Creation is a three-day live broadcast online event culminating on Earth Day, to raise awareness and funds for the Grandmothers’ new book publication, Grandmothers Wisdom: Reverence For All Creation.

Join us for a rare opportunity to engage with the Grandmothers Council as they connect with us on live video directly from their homelands to share their teachings, reflections and wisdom honoring Earth Day.

Members of the Grandmothers Council and special guests will join us on three 90-minute sessions, sharing about specific subjects, offering blessings, and a rare chance for live interactive audience participation Q&A’s.

Many followers of the Grandmothers Council were unable to participate in their official gatherings around the world; and now the Grandmothers are answering your call creating a global live broadcast online event to celebrate:

- April 20 The Rise of the Feminine,
- April 21 The importance of Spiritual Alliances and Legacy
- April 22 Reflections and Prayers on Earth Day

Confirmed Participating Grandmothers

Grandmother Flordemayo
Grandmother Mona Polacca
Grandmother Aama Bombo
Grandmother Bernadette Rebienot
Grandmother Rita Pitka Blumenstein
Grandmother Rita Long Visitor Holy Dance

Special Guests

Loretta Afraid of Bear – Oglala Lakota elder
Marie Arnaq Meade – Yup’ik elder
Lauren Walsh – Global Sisterhood co-founder
Marisol Villanueva – Grandmothers Wisdom project director

Moderator

Kari Henley – Age Without Borders founder

Musical Guest

Imani

REGISTER HERE

Day 1, Friday, April 20, 2018
The Rise of the Feminine – Grandmother’s Teachings

Grandmother Bernadette Rebienot
Grandmother Flordemayo
Grandmother Maria Alice (Pending confirmation)
Loretta Afraid of Bear – Oglala Lakota elder
Lauren Walsh – Global Sisterhood co-founder

Time: 3:PM EST

Day 2, Saturday, April 21, 2018
Grandmothers Council – Alliances, Succession and Legacy

Grandmother Rita Long Visitor Holy Dance
Grandmother Mona Polacca
Grandmother Flordemayo
Marisol Villanueva – Grandmothers Wisdom project director

Time: 3:PM EST

Day 3, Sunday, April 22, 2018
Grandmother Earth Day – A Prayer of Gratitude for Creation

Grandmother Rita Pitka Blumenstein
Grandmother Aama Bombo
Grandmother Mona Polacca
Grandmother Flordemayo
Marie Arnaq Meade – Yup’ik elder

Time: 12:PM EST

REGISTER HERE

UNIFY
US 501(c)3 Nonprofit Organization

Unify creates Globally Synchronized Events on Solstices and Equinoxes with a focus on celebrating our shared humanity around the world. At these times, we invite all people to meditate, host local ceremonies, pray and align with Source in their own way.

It is our conviction that we are One Human Family, transcendent of race, religion, or nation. By unifying at these times we create a living demonstration of our underlying unity and an Emerging Planetary Culture which embraces the interdependence and well-being of all.

Copyright © 2018 International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you opted in at our website or one of our events

Our mailing address is:
International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers
P.O. Box 19114
Tucson, AZ 85731


From: Indian Law Resource Center ilrc@indianlaw.org
Date: 2018-03-23
Subject: Indigenous Notes 2018, Issue 1
To: Evelin Cervenkova lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

CELEBRATE!

2018 marks 40 years of working to defend and advance the rights of indigenous peoples! And with the recent launch of a search for our next executive director, it marks the start of a new chapter for the Indian Law Resource Center.

Help us commemorate this exciting time: please consider making a donation of $140 or more, or pledge to make a monthly, $40 sustaining donation. Your continued support will help ensure the Center can endure and continue to promote justice for indigenous peoples for the next 40 years!

Indian Law Resource Center Launching Search for a New Executive Director

The Indian Law Resource Center Board of Directors is continuing its search for a new executive director. Over the course of 40 years, the Center has helped shape modern indigenous rights advocacy. The Center is widely recognized for its role in helping Indian and Alaska Native nations and other indigenous communities negotiate and win the adoptions of the UN and the American Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
(More ...)

Senate Resolution would designate a 2018 National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women

Photo courtesy Nativenewsonline.net
Senator Steve Daines (R-MT) has introduced a resolution to designate May 5, 2018, as the "National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls." The resolution seeks to honor Hanna Harris, a member of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, who was reported missing by her family in Lame Deer, Montana on July 5, 2013. When her body was found five days later, she had been raped and murdered. (More ...)

International Advocacy to Protect Indigenous Women and Children

During the 62nd session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, indigenous experts called for action to fix a legal system that too often leaves Native women, particularly those in rural America, unprotected from violence and sexual assault. The March 19 panel, part of the NGO-CSW62 Forum, took place along with a screening of select scenes from Wind River, a feature film that tackles the subjects of sexual assault and missing and murdered indigenous women. (More ...)

Commercial Interests vs. Traditional Ecological Knowledge

The Tlingit, Haida, Aleut, and Tsimpsian peoples of the Sitka Tribe of Alaska are fighting to protect Pacific herring in Sitka Sound. The Alaska Board of Fisheries accepts proposals on how to regulate specific fisheries on an annual basis, and the Sitka Tribe has been submitting proposals for several years in an effort to convince the Board to take steps to better conserve the herring fishery. In January 2018, the Board again declined to take most of the actions proposed by the Tribe, allowing the commercial harvest to continue at its current level. (More...)

Update: Implementing the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Since the of the adoption of the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on June 15, 2016, the Organization of American States has outlined steps toward advancing the promises in the declaration. (More ...)

INDIAN LAW RESOURCE CENTER

www.indianlaw.org
www.facebook.com/IndianLawResourceCenter

MAIN OFFICE:
602 N. Ewing Street
Helena, MT 59601

ph 406.449.2006

WASHINGTON DC OFFICE:
601 E Street SE
Washington, DC 20003

ph 202.547.2800


From: Indigenous Environmental Network media@ienearth.org
Date: 2018-03-20
Subject: Action Alert! Sign Petition to Keep Falsely Accused Brazilian Indigenous Leader out of Prison NOW!
To: Evelin Cervenkova lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

The Indigenous Environmental Network

PLEASE ... Sign Petition to Keep Falsely Accused Brazilian Indigenous Leader out of Prison -NOW!

Benki Piyãko, Ashaninka leader of the Upper Juruá region

SIGN PETITION HERE - ENGLISH
Will be delivered to:
Public Prosecutor's Office of the State of Acre and 1st Criminal Court of Cruzeiro do Sul

Sign petição em Português

The persecution suffered by indigenous peoples goes on. Benki Piyãco of the Ashaninka People is one of the most respected young indigenous leaders in Brazil. Its commitment to the protection of the Amazon rainforest and its guardians, the Indigenous Peoples, as well as to the reforestation of the Ashaninka territory and for agroforestry programs, is acclaimed and rewarded around the world. The growing influence of Benki Ashaninka has apparently become a threat to those who profit from the destruction of the planet's green lung.

We must all mobilize to protect this man who works for the common interest of humanity. Remind that that Brazil is the country with the largest number of environmental activists murdered, with indigenous representatives frequently persecuted, including by the Brazilian authorities.

Join our collective and sign the petition launched by Benki Ashaninka's lawyer. It will be handed over to the Brazilian Public Ministry.

SIGN PETITION HERE - ENGLISH
Will be delivered to:
Public Prosecutor's Office of the State of Acre and 1st Criminal Court of Cruzeiro do Sul

Sign petição em Português

WHY IT'S IMPORTANT

After being threatened in the city of Marechal Thaumaturgo (in the Brazilian state of Acre), Benki Piyãko, Ashaninka leader of the Upper Juruá region, sought help from the local police. He reported to the authorities the risks of violence against himself, because of his role as an internationally recognized environmental activist, and as representative of the Ashaninka Community of the Amônia River.

After listening to the accused ones, and without hearing Benki neither other witnesses, the police decided to dismiss the complaint. Even worse, the police authority accused Benki for the crime of false accusation, demanding the prosecution of the indigenous leader.

The State Prosecutor's Office has agreed to follow up the case and has opened an information procedure against Benki, who can face a sentence of up to 8 years of imprisonment. The case is currently in the pre-trial phase and will be judged soon. Defense lawyer Antônio Rodrigo Machado has long been active in the defense of the Ashaninka people and is very active in the fight against illegal logging. According to him, "Benki Piyãko has sought the Brazilian state to demand the protection of police forces and now he is, on the opposite, on the dock, charged with a crime he did not commit. Victim of the selective nature of the Brazilian penal system, it is not only the freedom of Benki who is at stake, but also the respect due by the country to the Peoples of the Forest and their cultures.

SIGN PETITION HERE - ENGLISH
Will be delivered to:
Public Prosecutor's Office of the State of Acre and 1st Criminal Court of Cruzeiro do Sul

Sign petição em Português

COLLECTIVE FOR THE SUPPORT OF À BENKI PIYÃCO ASHANINKA
France Libertés
Nature Rights
Planète Amazone

Français

SIGNEZ LA PÉTITION POUR QUE LE PROTECTEUR de l'Amazone BENKI PIYANCO ASHANINKA NE SOIT PAS MIS EN PRISON AU BRÉSIL PAR UNE PARODIE DE JUSTICE

Signe/part: https://lc.cx/ddpG (traduction ci-dessous)

La persécution des peuples autochtones continue. Benki Piyãnco du peuple Ashaninka est un des leaders indigènes brésiliens de la jeune garde la plus respectée. Son engagement à protéger la forêt tropicale humide d'Amazone et ses gardiens, peuples autochtones, le reboisement et des programmes d'agroforesterie est acclamé et récompensé dans le monde entier. Son influence croissante est apparemment devenue une trop grande menace à ceux qui profitent de la destruction du poumon vert de la planète, qui est essentiel pour notre propre survie.

Nous devons tous mobiliser pour protéger cet homme qui travaille pour l'intérêt commun de l'humanité.

Bien habitué à être témoin de la persécution juridique des activistes indigènes au Brésil, le pays avec le plus grand nombre d' activistes environnementaux assassinés dans le monde, Planète Amazone tient à établir un partenariat avec n'importe quelle organisation ou personnalité qui peut aider à divulguer la pétition déposée. Sur Avaaz par l'avocat de Benki, que nous avons connu et avons admiré depuis longtemps,

POURQUOI C'EST IMPORTANT

Après être menacé dans la ville de Marechal Thaumaturgo (l'état brésilien d'Acre) après des conflits de territoires, Benki Piyãko, Ashaninka le leader de la région d'Alto Juruá, s'est plaint à la police pour rapporter les risques de la violence contre lui, à cause deson rôle comme un activiste environnemental et un promoteur d'agroforesterie internationalement reconnue et primée et le responsable de la communauté Ashaninka d'Amônia - Apiwtxa la Rivière(le Fleuve).

L'enquête de la plainte est allée au siège social de la municipalité, examinant seulement les allégations de l'accusé et sans entendre Benki Piyãnco ou les membres de son association, ils se sont décidés, non pas seulement pour la plainte, mais aussi à l'accuser, demandant l'ouverture de p oursuites judiciaires contre le leader indigène lui-même, pour le crime de dénonciation calomnieuse.

Le procureur de l'État d'Acre a accepté l'acte d'accusation et la suite de l'affaire criminelle contre Benki Piyãnco et maintenant le leader Ashaninka peut être condamné à un maximum de huit ans en prison. Le processus de la preuve dans la première salle du criminel dans Cruzeiro Sul / AC la région est dans l'argument final pour la défense et l'accusation et elle jugera bientôt. L'avocat responsable de la défense de Benki est Antonio Rodrigo Machado, aussi actif dans la défense du peuple Ashaninka dans d'autres affaires contre des bûcherons.

Selon l'avocat, "c'est à cause de Benki Piyãnco a demandé à l'état brésilien de profiter de la protection de police qu'au contraire, il se trouve étant aujourd'hui assis sur le banc des accusés pour un crime qu'il n'a pas commis. En devenant la victime du favoritisme du système de justice pénale brésilien, c'est non seulement la liberté de Benki que l'on menace, mais particulièrement le respect de ce pays vers les Peuples de la Forêt et leurs cultures."

Espagnol

FIRME LA PETICIÓN PARA QUE EL PROTECTOR NACIDO de la Amazona BENKI PIYANCO ASHANINKA SEA METIDO EN LA CÁRCEL EN BRASIL POR UNA PARODIADO DE JUSTICIA

Signo / parte: https://lc.cx/ddpG (traducción más abajo)

La persecución de los pueblos autóctonos continúa. Benki Piyãnco del pueblo Ashaninka es uno de los líderes indígenas brasileños de la joven guardia más respetada. Su compromiso en proteger el bosque tropical húmedo de Amazona y sus guardiánes, pueblos autóctonos, la repoblación forestal y de programas de agrosilvicultura es aclamado y recompensado en el mundo entero.

Su influencia creciente aparentemente se hizo una amenaza demasiado grande a los que sacan provecho de la destrucción del pulmón verde del planeta, los que es esencial para nuestra propia supervivencia.

Nosotros todos debemos movilizar para proteger a este hombre que trabaja para el interés común del humanidad.

Bien acostumbrado a ser testigo de la persecución jurídica de los activistas indígenas en Brasil, el país con número más grande de los activistas medioambientales asesinados en el mundo, Planeta Amazona quiere establecer una colaboración con cualquier organización o personalidad que puede ayudar a divulgar la petición registrada. Sobre Avaaz por el abogado de Benki, al que conocemos y admiramos desde hace tiempo,

POR QUÉ ES IMPORTANTE

Después de ser amenazado en la ciudad de Marechal Thaumaturgo (el estado brasileño de Acre) después de conflictos de territorio, Benki Piyãko, Ashaninka el líder de la región deViola Juruá, se quejó a la policía para denunciar los riesgos de la violencia contra él, a causa de su papel como un activista medioambiental y un promotor de agrosilvicultura internacionalmente reconocida y premiada y el responsable de la comunidad Ashaninka d' Amônia - Apiwtxa el Río.

La investigación de la denuncia fue a la sede de la municipalidad, examinando solamente las alegaciones del acusado y sin oír a Benki Piyãnco o los miembros de su asociación se decidieron no sólo la denuncia, sino que también acusarlo, pidiendo la apertura de persecuciones judiciales contra el líder indígena mismo, para el crimen de denuncia calumniosa.

El fiscal del Estado de Acre aceptó el acta de acusación y la continuación del asunto criminal contra Benki Piyãnco y que mantenían al líder Ashaninka puede ser condenado a un máximo de ocho años en prisión. El proceso de la prueba en la primera sala de lo criminal en Cruzeiro Sul / AC la región está en el argumento final para la defensa y la acusación y juzgará pronto.

El abogado responsable de la defensa de Benki es Antonio Rodrigo Machado, tan activo en la defensa del pueblo Ashaninka y en otros casos contra leñadores. Según el abogado, " es a causa de Benki Piyãnco pidió en el estado brasileño sacar provecho de la protección de policía que al contrario, se encuentre el que hoy sea sentado en el banquillo de acusados para un crimen que no se comprometió.
Haciéndose la víctima”

The Indigenous Environmental Network | PO Box 485 | Bemidji, MN 56619 | http://www.ienearth.org/


From: Tribal College Journal publisher@tribalcollegejournal.org
Date: 2018-03-16
Subject: Support news coverage of American Indian higher education
To: lakotaoyateinfo@googlemail.com

Read on to see why your tax-deductible donation is so important to the future of Indian Country...

Dear Friend of the Tribal College Journal,

More than forty years ago, a handful of American Indian educators and activists had a vision to create tribally controlled colleges from the ground up. Known as Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), these grassroots, place-based educational institutions have grown and multiplied, creating an international Indigenous education movement.

Not only are the TCUs successfully educating thousands, they are rebuilding tribal communities, strengthening tribal sovereignty, and transforming economies and the natural environment.

And the Tribal College Journal is their voice. Since 1989, our writers have been tackling issues such as environmental sustainability, leadership, cultural identity, and health, giving you the inside scoop on subjects important to the future of American Indians -- straight from the source.

Throughout the coming year, you will meet American Indian scholars who are changing lives, and policy makers who are changing the face of tribal nations. You will also meet the students -- tomorrow's leaders whose hope, determination, and talent inspire and ensure a better future for all American Indians.

Tribal College Journal can share the work of the tribal colleges with you because of our unique relationship with our community of readers. Not only do many of you renew your subscriptions every year, but many of you also give to the Tribal College Journal.

Tribal College Journal stretches every dollar we receive to produce our high quality magazine, website, and e-newsletters. However, subscriptions and advertising don't cover our costs. We must rely on dedicated people like you to keep our award-winning publication alive.

Your extra help is critical because it supports the quality journalism TCJ shares with our national (and international) audience. It helps pay for the research and writing of articles. It also helps pay for the website, proof-readers, photographers, and the phone bill.

Without you, there is no Tribal College Journal -- no in-depth reporting, no national coverage on critical issues in Indian Country. Despite all that we have accomplished together, there is still so much more to do.

Please support TCJ -- send us your tax-deductible donation today. Help spread the vision of the tribal college movement. We promise to use your investment effectively and wisely.

Sincerely,

Rachael Marchbanks
Publisher

Tribal College Journal
P.O. Box 720 | Mancos, CO 81328
(970) 533-9170 - phone
www.tribalcollegejournal.org

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